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Advanced Software Tool Uncovers New Cancer-Driving Genes
Advanced Software Tool Uncovers New Cancer-Driving Genes

Advanced Software Tool Uncovers New Cancer-Driving Genes

Washington, 27 Sep (ONA) --- An advanced software tool for analyzing DNA sequences from tumor samples has uncovered likely new cancer-driving genes, in a study led by Weill Cornell Medicine researchers.

In the study, published in Nature Communications, the researchers designed the software, known as CSVDriver, to map and analyze the locations of large mutations, known as structural variants (SVs), in tumor DNA datasets. They then applied the tool to a dataset of 2,382 genomes from 32 different cancer types, analyzing the cancer genomes from different organ systems separately. The results confirmed the likely cancer-driving roles of 47 genes, tentatively linked several of these to certain cancer types for the first time, and pointed to 26 other genes as likely cancer drivers even though they had never been linked to cancer before.

"Our results show that CSVDriver could be broadly useful for the cancer research community, providing new insights into cancer development as well as potential new targets" said study senior author Dr. Ekta Khurana, associate professor of physiology and biophysics and co-leader of the Cancer Genetics and Epigenetics Program at the Meyer Cancer Center at Weill Cornell Medicine.

CSVDriver also demonstrated its worth as a discovery tool by uncovering some known cancer-linked genes as likely drivers of cancers to which they had not been linked before, for example the gene DMD in esophageal cancer, and NF1 in ovarian cancer. Moreover, the results also highlighted 26 genes that had not been linked to cancer before as likely cancer drivers.

--- Ends/Thuraiya/Khalid